The Open Heart

We’ve all got them in our lives. Those who use their talents to better the circumstances of perfect strangers, the ones for whom action becomes the antidote to cynicism. The reason the term “salt of the earth” was invented. Meet Brookwood endocrinologist and president of For Nicaraguan Health non-profit Rodolfo “Rudy” Vargas. When Vargas left…

Into the Woods

Most stress is of our own making.

If you doubt this statement, spend just five minutes talking with Tracie Noles-Ross.

Embracing the concept of permaculture and the simple abundance of self-sufficiency, this Roebuck-area Renaissance woman — a painter, sculptor, gardener, beekeeper and mother, to name but a few of her roles — is living a life delightfully out of sync with what many would define as the American Dream.

Sisterhood of Solidarity

True to our Paleolithic roots, we 21st century ladies are still, at our core, gatherers in every sense of the word.

We take great pride in caring for our nest and those who dwell in it.

But there comes a time when even the most motherly goose, to avoid becoming a total birdbrain, must occasionally fly the coop.

So, resorting to what we know best, we seek out a few like-minded friends, gathering together for a little self-nurturing, and maybe even for a bit of note swapping on whose spouse most deserves the award for “Cro-Magnon of the Week.”

It is in that spirit of therapeutic sisterhood that one long-established, and two not so long-established, casual women’s social groups have developed.

Read on for a bit of inspiration, then gather up your own circle of friends, start a new girls-only tradition, and enjoy what is long overdue—time for you.

For the love of Daniel

For most college-bound 18-year-olds, the countdown to graduation is rife with excitement. Goodbye, structured schedules. Hello, sweet freedom!

And while Vestavia Hills High School senior Adam Sturdivant shares his classmates’ enthusiasm for starting university life, he is also quietly reflecting on the one person he most wants to share his college experiences with, the one who won’t be joining Adam at Auburn this fall—his twin brother, Daniel.

With an intensity seldom seen among siblings, Adam—older by a mere 30 seconds —has a deep and abiding affection for his brother.